Potassium Iodide


Potassium Iodide

Description:
!!! NO CONSULT OR PRESCRIPTION NEEDED !!! How does KI (potassium iodide) work? The thyroid gland cannot tell the difference between stable and radioactive iodine. It will absorb both. KI (potassium iodide) blocks radioactive iodine from entering the thyroid. When a person takes KI, the stable iodine in the medicine gets absorbed by the thyroid. Because KI contains so much stable iodine, the thyroid gland becomes “full” and cannot absorb any more iodine—either stable or radioactive—for the next 24 hours. KI (potassium iodide) may not give a person 100% protection against radioactive iodine. Protection will increase depending on three factors. Time after contamination: The sooner a person takes KI, the more time the thyroid will have to “fill up” with stable iodine. Absorption: The amount of stable iodine that gets to the thyroid depends on how fast KI is absorbed into the blood. Dose of radioactive iodine: Minimizing the total amount of radioactive iodine a person is exposed to will lower the amount of harmful radioactive iodine the thyroid can absorb.